Skeptics in the Pub, Leicester

Skeptics in the Pub, Leicester hosts a speaker in a pub on the third Tuesday of every month. We ask for a £3 donation to speaker's expenses.

Our upcoming events are listed below.  If you're new to this site, please read the about us page.

If you're not sure what skepticism is all about, please read this.

Info on parking, places to eat etc. can be found here.  Why not join our Facebook group?

This isn’t just a simple talk; it’s a call to arms.

Chris Peters

When?
Tuesday, October 21 2014 at 7:30PM

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Where?

139 London Road,
Leicester,
LE2 1EF

Who?
Chris Peters

What's the talk about?

Every day, we hear claims about what is good for our health, bad for the environment, how to improve education, cut crime, and treat disease. Some are based on reliable evidence and scientific rigour. Many are not.  These claims can't be regulated; every time one is debunked another pops up – like a game of whack-a-mole. So how can we make companies, politicians, commentators and official bodies accountable for the claims they make? If they want us to vote for them, believe them, or buy their products, then we should ask them for evidence, as consumers, patients, voters and citizens.

The Ask for Evidence campaign has seen people ask a retail chain for the evidence behind its MRSA resistant pyjamas; ask a juice bar for the evidence behind wheatgrass detox claims; ask the health department about rules for Viagra prescriptions; ask for the studies behind treatments for Crohn's disease, and hundreds more. As a result, claims are being withdrawn and bodies held to account. 

This is geeks, working with the public, to park their tanks on the lawn of those who seek to influence us. And it's starting to work.

Come and hear what the campaign is going to do next and how you can get involved!

When?
Tuesday, November 18 2014 at 7:30PM

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(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

139 London Road,
Leicester,
LE2 1EF

Who?
Andrew Tampion

What's the talk about?

 In May the European Court of Justice controversially ruled that individuals have the legal right to require that search engines to remove links connecting them to webpages containing information that is irrelevant or outdated. Since then over 100,000 requests the removal of links have been made to Google alone. 

What is the background to this decision, how did the case come before the court, what did the court actually decide and what are the implications for search engines, for the media and for the public?